Layer

NameWA Journey Ways - Drought Journey 2
Description

From 35,000 years ago onwards, Earth was moving into one of the most severe glaciations with temperatures dropping to 6 to 10 degrees below current temperatures. By 22,000 years ago the glaciers were 33thickest with ice sheets covering most continents. Sea levels were at their lowest dropping to approximately 150 to 400 metres below current levels. Old water ecosystems disappeared and arid areas expanded. Australian glaciers did not extend into Western Australia however the countryside suffered an extreme drought of 10,000 years that lasted between 25,000 and 15,000 years ago. Archaeologists suggest that Aboriginal people survived the drought by clustering in refuges where there was permanent water and by visiting other refuges when the climate permitted. In Western Australia refuges were Nyoongar territory, the Pilbara tablelands and the Kimberley. This journey was made from eastern Nyoongar land to the southern Kimberley region following the salt lakes. 

TypeJourney
Content Warning
ContributorJacqui Wright
Entries9
Allow ANPS? No
Added to System2023-07-25 10:46:01
Updated in System2023-08-14 15:43:02
Subject indigenous, aboriginal, western australia, journey way, deep time, refuges, drought, ice age
CreatorFrancesca Robertson, Noel Nannup and Jason Barrow in in 'Journey Ways' project, Dr Francesca Robertson, Dr Noel Nannup, Alison Nannup.
PublisherWA Journey Ways is a collaboration of Kurongkurl Katitjin, Edith Cowan University and WA Main Roads.
Contactbill.pascoe@newcastle.edu.au
Citation

Robertson, F., Nannup, N. and Barrow J. 'Great Journeys undertaken by Aboriginal people in ancient times in Western Australia', Batchelor Press, 2019.

DOI
Source URLhttps://batchelorpress.com/node/386
Linkbackhttps://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/community-environment/aboriginal-engagement/aboriginal-journey-ways/
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LanguageEN
LicenseCopyright. Do not re-use without permission.
Usage Rights

Permissions from Francesca Robertson, Noel Nannup and Jason Barrow for use of material from’ Great Journeys undertaken by Aboriginal People in Western Australia in Ancient times’ (Robertson, Nannup and Barrow, Batchelor Press 2019).  Permission for use of the story provided by Wayne Webb for the Great Journeys book for TLC Map. Do not use without permission.

Date Created (externally)2023-07-25

Drought Journey 2 

Placename
Kepacurl 
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-33.861944
Longitude
121.894444
Start Date
-25000
End Date
-15000

Description

Kepacurl (Esperance) would have been inland when people made this journey. Now cleared for farming this land, this part of the Great Southern Woodlands was once a rich source of food. During the drought the trees would have captured water from the winds coming of the Great Southern Ocean. 

Sources

TLCMap ID
tc215b
Linkback
https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/community-environment/aboriginal-engagement/aboriginal-journey-ways/
Created At
2023-07-26 10:10:55
Updated At
2023-12-11 17:50:10

Drought Journey 2

Placename
Jimberlana 
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-32.208611
Longitude
121.079722
Start Date
-25000
End Date
-15000

Description

It is possible that Jimberlana  (Norseman) is a mangle of djimbarl (flint spear) because this is parna purinya (stony ground) within the forests. To the east is Munda Boornup (Rock of the earth now the Fraser Range) and to the west is a group of hills including Charles Peake where there is plenty of flint. Flint was used to tip spears and it was also used to make fire. Jimberlana a was a crossroads on the trade route for ancient Aboriginal people. 

Sources

TLCMap ID
tc215c
Linkback
https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/community-environment/aboriginal-engagement/aboriginal-journey-ways/
Created At
2023-07-26 10:10:55
Updated At
2023-12-11 17:50:10

Drought Journey 2

Placename
Coolgardie 
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-30.955
Longitude
121.176111
Start Date
-25000
End Date
-15000

Description

In local language koolgoor is a mulga tree, coolgabbi is a tree near a waterhole and coorgardie is the Bungarra lizard. 

Sources

TLCMap ID
tc215d
Linkback
https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/community-environment/aboriginal-engagement/aboriginal-journey-ways/
Created At
2023-07-26 10:10:55
Updated At
2023-12-11 17:50:10

Drought Journey 2

Placename
Kalgoorlie 
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-30.749722
Longitude
121.465833
Start Date
-25000
End Date
-15000

Description

Kalgoorlie is derived from the Wangka word karlkurla, meaning place of the silky pears. If this was a place of silky pears it would have been very important for local Aboriginal people. Silky pears, also known as bush bananas, were a staple food in the diet of the people of the central desert. They ate the flowers as well as the fruit. More mature fruit was cooked hot embers.

Sources

TLCMap ID
tc215e
Linkback
https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/community-environment/aboriginal-engagement/aboriginal-journey-ways/
Created At
2023-07-26 10:10:55
Updated At
2023-12-11 17:50:10

Drought Journey 2

Placename
Weeloona 
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-26.637778
Longitude
120.246667
Start Date
-25000
End Date
-15000

Description

Weeloona (Wiluna) is in the traditional territory of the Tjupany people. The name is thought to reflect the cry of native curlew birds in the area. Around Weeloona in the wet season freshwater lakes appear that attract many forms of wildlife It is this bounty that would have made it significant for Aboriginal people on the ancient north-south trade routes.  Weeloona was also probably a connecting point for those conducting trade deep within the central desert. 

Sources

TLCMap ID
tc215f
Linkback
https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/community-environment/aboriginal-engagement/aboriginal-journey-ways/
Created At
2023-07-26 10:10:55
Updated At
2023-12-11 17:50:10

Drought Journey 2

Placename
Yiwarra Kuju 
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-25.409167
Longitude
120.955556
Start Date
-25000
End Date
-15000

Description

Yiwarra Kuju (Canning Stock Route, was an ancient journey way. They were still using the journey way in the 1900s when they first encountered European people who were constructing the rabbit proof fence and the Canning Stock Route. The rabbit proof fence had a hut and a water source approximately every 45 miles. For a Martu perspective on the loss of lands read Davenport, Sue, Johnson, Peter, ‚ÄúYuwali Cleared Out First Contact in the Western Desert‚ÄĚ, Aboriginal Studies Press, Australia, 2005.¬†

Sources

TLCMap ID
tc2160
Linkback
https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/community-environment/aboriginal-engagement/aboriginal-journey-ways/
Created At
2023-07-26 10:10:55
Updated At
2023-12-11 17:50:10

Drought Journey 2

Placename
Balnagana 
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-18.325556
Longitude
128.003889
Start Date
-25000
End Date
-15000

Description

Yiwarra Kuju leads the traveller to the head of Sturt Creek. Follow this down into Balnagana (Flora Valley), at the base of the Kimberley Plateau close to what is now called Halls Creek. 

Sources

TLCMap ID
tc2161
Linkback
https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/community-environment/aboriginal-engagement/aboriginal-journey-ways/
Created At
2023-07-26 10:10:55
Updated At
2023-12-11 17:50:10

Drought Journey 2

Placename
Purnululu 
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-17.680278
Longitude
128.488611
Start Date
-25000
End Date
-15000

Description

The traveller can follow the Sturt Creek as a tributary of Goonoonoorrang (Ord River) and walk its banks until it reaches the sea. This route takes one to the east of Purnululu and the Bungle Bungles. 

Sources

TLCMap ID
tc2162
Linkback
https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/community-environment/aboriginal-engagement/aboriginal-journey-ways/
Created At
2023-07-26 10:10:55
Updated At
2023-12-11 17:50:10

Drought Journey 2

Placename
Kununurra 
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-15.793056
Longitude
128.733889
Start Date
-25000
End Date
-15000

Description

Goonoonoorrang (Ord River) is the traditional homelands of the Miriuwung Gajerrong people whose name for the big river was Goonoonoorrang, which Miriwoong men David Newry and Murphy Simon think was anglicised to Kununurra. The Miriwoong people traditionally lived in the upper reaches of Goonoonoorrang and the Gajerrong lived in the lower reaches. An estimated 30,000 Aboriginal people lived around there before European colonisation. 

Sources

TLCMap ID
tc2163
Linkback
https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/community-environment/aboriginal-engagement/aboriginal-journey-ways/
Created At
2023-07-26 10:10:55
Updated At
2023-12-11 17:50:10
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